SOCIAL WORK - Central University of Rajasthan

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CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF RAJASTHAN DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK M.A./Ph.D (SOCIAL WORK) PROGRAMME

PREAMBLE: The Department of Social Work established in 2012 is actively involved in academic and field-based practices. It strives to work towards inclusive and sustainable development and believes in promoting maximum human potentials, skill development, equal opportunity, justice, respect for diversity and anti-discriminatory environment within the society.

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of department are as follows:     

To impart education and training in professional social work in order to provide man-power in social welfare, development and allied fields capable of working at various levels of micro, meso and macro systems. To help students develop knowledge, skills, attitudes and values appropriate to the practices of social work profession. To enable students to develop critical and creative thinking and ability, to apply theoretical knowledge in practice of social work. To facilitate interdisciplinary approach for better understanding of social problems, and issues of development. To develop skills related to research, capacity building, policy formulation and planning.

Salient Features  

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Strive to work towards creating self-determination, interdependence, respect for diversity and anti-discriminatory environment within the society. Offers curriculum directed towards equipping students with knowledge, skills, values and attitudes to understand human needs, potentials, resources and services to develop fully humane professionals. Provides intensive con-current and block field work training to students in the areas of rural development, governance and organizational efforts. Designed compulsory Rural Educational Camp of 10 days duration for students to provide exposure of rural issues and organized intervention. Organized Group Conference and Skill Laboratory training/workshop to enhance the micro skill development of the students. Focused on action research, innovative field action project, evidence based practice and promotion of community colleges in rural areas.

DURATION OF THE PROGRAMME: a) M.A. (Social Work) Programme: Four Semesters of two years b) Ph.D (Social Work) Programme: Minimum Six semester & Maximum Ten semester for the submission of thesis from the date of registration.

ADMISSION PROCEDURE: The admission to the course shall be through an entrance examination to be conducted by CUCET on all- India basis.

ELIGIBILITY OF THE CANDIDATES: a) M.A.(Social Work) Programme: Any graduate of a recognized University with a minimum of 50% marks or equivalent grade in aggregate for general category and 45% or equivalent grade for SC/ST/OBC/PWD candidates. b) Ph.D (Social Work) Programme: Any graduate of a recognized University with a minimum of 50% marks or equivalent grade in aggregate for general category and 45% or equivalent grade for SC/ST/OBC/PWD candidates.

SYLLABUS OF THE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION: The syllabus of the entrance examination is as declared by the university on time-to-time and put on the university website.

PROSPECTIVE CAREER/PLACEMENT FOR STUDENTS    

NGO Sector Industry/Corporate sector Welfare and Development Department of Government International Organisation

ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT: Lectures/Seminar/Conference/Workshop organized: 

Organized Day-long workshop on ‘Concept of Community College and Its’ Implementation’ on 15th January 2013 in the Conference Hall, Academic Block-I, Central University of Rajasthan by Dr S. Xavier Alphonse, S.J (Director), Indian Centre for Research and Development of Community Education (ICRDCE), Chennai, Tamil Nadu.



Organized ‘University Level Poster Competition on Disability’ to observe ‘International Day of Persons with Disabilities’ on 16th January 2013 in the premises of Academic Block-I, Central University of Rajasthan.



Organized Special lecture on ‘Disability and Youth’ to observe ‘International Day of Persons with Disabilities’ on 16th January 2013 in the Conference Hall, Academic Block-I, Central University of Rajasthan by Dr.Ajeet Sharma, Deputy Director, Specially Abled Persons Unit, Department of Social Justice and Empowerment, Rajasthan State.



Organized ‘Poster Exhibition Events’ on University Convocation Day, 1st September, 2012 at Central University of Rajasthan. The students exhibited the issues of rural areas and social work intervention/activities through display of posters.



Organized Day-long ‘Exposure Visit’ for M.A. (Social Work) Semester-I, 2012 on 2nd August, 2012 at Mahila Sada Suraksha Kendra (MSSK), Dudu, Rajasthan. The exposure visit to MSSK oriented students about the causes and consequences of Domestic Violence, Domestic violence Act 2005 and roles and responsibilities of service providers.

Projects/Any other achievements: I)

II)

III)

Rural Education Camp: The department of social work has organised Ten (10) Days ‘Rural Education Camp’ for M.A.(Social Work) Semester-II, 2013 students at Chetana Arogya Mandir and Samaj Seva Samitee, Jadol Block, Udaipur between 21 st February-2nd March, 2013, where students have addressed various health and social issues of tribal people with various welfare and developmental activities. Day-Care Centre: The Department of Social Work has established Day Care Centre in the month of December’2012 under the Merge scheme of UGC with an objective to provide healthy environment to the children below the age of six years belonging to the construction workers of the University. It is located in the Southern side of University campus around One Km from Academic Block. The infrastructure of Day care Centre includes 30 x 30 Sq. Ft. Dormitory with one room and a verandah. Besides, there is about 50 to 70 Sq. Ft. open space available for children to play. It is also having toilet facility and a basin including a water cooler and two solar panels. There are two helpers (Ayas) for taking care of the children. Department of Social Work has also placed two students of M.A. First semester for fieldwork practicum and two faculty members to regulate the day to day functioning of Day Care Centre w. e. f. 13th August’2013. The Social work Trainees have been applying methods of social work with day care centre children in order to perform various activities and bring change in marginalized children. III) Promotion of Community Radio Scheme (CRS): In order to introduce the concept and utility of CRS to the target rural population, the preliminary meetings have been conducted at Patan, Bandersindhri and Mundoti villages on 18th and 19th October, 2012 with the direct involvement of rural community of the area-farmers, artisans, school children and teachers, traditional communicators, health workers for making

IV.

programmes and sharing information with each other. In order to introduce the concept and utility of CRS to the target rural population, the preliminary meetings have been conducted at Patan, Bandersindhri and Mundoti villages on 18th and 19th October, 2012 at the respective villages. The Head, Faculty members and Students of Department of Social Work, Central University of Rajasthan, Bandersindri actively participated in the meeting and played a pivotal role in communicating the importance of Community Radio programme for the overall development of rural areas. Community College: Inception of Community College: In order to follow the mandate of Ministry of Human Resource Development and meet the great demand-supply mismatch in the country as economy needs much more skilled manpower in India. The Department of Social Work, Central University of Rajasthan took lead to start ‘Community College’ through different Educational institutions of Rajasthan from the academic session 2013. Moreover, It also brought together all stakeholders such as industry, business, service sectors as well as NGO sector to update on the requirements of skill development and become responsible stakeholders in curriculum development, training of trainers, providing guest faculty, practical training, evaluation and future employment of the learners who graduate from these community colleges. Keeping this in view, the Central University of Rajasthan has developed its own model of community college to achieve the goal of Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of Indian and generate employability among youth with the help of government. The proposal of community college has been accepted and Rs. 38,00,000/- has been sanctioned by University Grant Commission to set up community college in the university campus. In order to start community college, the two courses namely A) B.Voc (Interior Design) and B) Diploma in Early Childhood Care and Development(ECCD) shall be offered from the academic session 2014-15.

IV) Health Camp/Activities: a) General Health Camp: Organised Day-long ‘General Health Camp’ in collaboration with Mahaveer Cancer Hospital, Jaipur and YN.Hospital, Kishangarh, Rajasthan on 14th October, 2012 at Bandarsindri village and the University campus. The event was a huge success with more than 500 people participated and got the benefits of general health check up and free medicine at health camp. The purpose of creating awareness through exhibition amongst the people regarding the cancer importance of lifestyle, physical activity and nutrition in prevention and management of lifestyle-related diseases was fulfilled to a large extent through the health camp. b) Diagnosis, Free Check-Ups and Counselling:-The campaign was financially supported Central University of Rajasthan. The event was a huge success with more than 500 people participating in the activity. c) To make the people aware about the Department of Social Work. Many people of different villages came in CURAJ for check-up and at that time they saw the exhibition also which was organized by the Department of Social Work to make the people aware about many type of diseases, some of the students of social work department explained them about the purpose of exhibition that what kind of diseases are in the present time and what are their causes,

symptoms and prevention method also. The students also explained them about the work of Social Work department and also about the activities of social work students that how, why and for whom they are working with the individuals, group, community and in different agencies. The purpose of creating awareness through exhibition amongst the people regarding the cancer importance of lifestyle, physical activity and nutrition in prevention and management of lifestyle-related diseases was fulfilled to a large extent.

Some of the photographs of departmental activities:

(The Former MHRD Minister Shri.Kapil Sibal & Vice-Chancellor Prof. M.M.Salunkhe at the Poster Exhibition of Department of Social Work)

(Promotion of the concept of community-radio scheme among rural community by the staff and students of Department of Social Work)

(Establishment of Day Care Centre for the children’s of construction workers at the university)

(Con-current field work activities of social work students with the rural schools)

M.A. (Social Work) Programme Department of Social Work School of Social Sciences Central University of Rajasthan Course Curriculum Framework Semester I Subject Code

Subject Title

MSW-101

Sociology Concepts for Social Work Personality Development and Dynamics of Behaviour Working with Individuals

MSW-102 MSW-103

Hours Per Semester 30 hrs

Credits

Marks

Faculty

Core Domain

2 Credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic Thematic and Practice based Course Thematic and Practice based Course Interdisciplinary

MSW-104

Concurrent Field Work ( Field labs)

180 hrs

12 credits

100

SW Faculty

MSW-105

Foundation of Social Work Education

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

MSW-106

Communication Skills

30 hrs

2 credits

100

MSW-107

Computer Skills

30 hrs

2 credits

100

English Deptt. Faculty Computer Science Faculty

Total

Hrs 360

24 Credits

700

Interdisciplinary

Semester-II Subject Code

Subject Title

Hours Credits Per Semester

Marks

Faculty

Core Domain

MSW-201

Working with Groups

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-202

Working with Communities

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-203

Development, Displacement and Forced Migration

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-204

Social Work Research

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-205

Concurrent Field Work (Field Lab)

180 hrs

12 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic and Practise Based Course

MSW-206

Workshop and Seminar on Skill Development

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic and Practise Based Course

MSW-207

Rural Practicum/Camp

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic and Practise Based Course

Total

360 hrs

24 credits

700

Semester-III Subject Code

Subject Title

Hours Per Semester

Credits

Marks Faculty

Core Domain

MSW-301

NGO Management

30hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-302

Development Management

30hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-303

Women, Gender and Social Work

30hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-304

Social Welfare Administration

30hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-305

Block Field Work

240 hrs

16 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

Total

360 hrs

24 credits

500

Semester-IV Subject Code

Subject Title

Hours Per Semester

Credits

Marks

Faculty

Core Domain

MSW-401

Policy, Law and Governance

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-402

Block Field Work*

240 hrs

16 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic and Practice Based Course

MSW-403

Social Action and Advocacy

30 hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Interdisciplinary

MSW-404

Dissertation** 60hrs

4 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic and Practice Based Course

Total

360hrs

24 credits

400

*Field work in fourth semester will have extra hours and credits because students will be encouraged to undertake detailed project work. **Optional Courses of 4 Credits to be taken by students in lieu of Dissertation.

Semester-IV Optional Courses* Sr. No

Subject Title

Hours Per Semester

Credits

Marks

Faculty

Core Domain

MSW-405 (OC)

Health and Social Work

30hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW-406 (OC)

Disaster Management and Social Work

30hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW407(OC)

Social Exclusion and Social Work

30hrs

2 credits

100

SW Faculty

Thematic

MSW408/ MAE- 406 (OC)

Creative Writing

60hrs

4 credits

200

MA English Faculty

Interdisciplinary

MSW409(OC)

Community Radio

30hrs

2 Credits

100

Interdisciplinary

*Optional Courses (OC): Optional Courses for 4 Credits to be taken by students in lieu of Dissertation.

Credit Summary Semester

Number of Credits

Hours

I

24

360

II

24

360

III

24

360

IV

24

360

Total

96 Credits

1440 hrs

Semester I Course: MSW-101 Sociological Concepts for Social Work

Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To understand the history and philosophy of sociological knowledge. b) To understand the relevance of sociological knowledge for social work practice c) To understand the relevance of sociological/social theories to social work practice Course Outline Unit-I: Society: Basic Concepts a) b) c) d)

Social Structure: Values and Norms Social Institutions Socialization Culture: Concept and Theories

Unit-II: Social Stratification a) b) c) d)

Social Stratification: Concept, Theories and Issues Social Change Social Movements Social Control

Unit-III: Social Theory and Social Work a) b) c) d)

Functionalism, Positivism and Realism Phenomenology Marxism and Critical Theories, Feminist Theories Subaltern Studies & Indian Social Thinkers

Assessment -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading List: 1. Giddens, A (2000) Introduction to Sociology. 2. Nisbet, Robert (1997) Introduction to Sociology.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Smelser, N.J (1970) Introduction to Sociology: Gore, M.S (1982) Education and Modernization in India, Rawat Publication, Jaipur. Kapadia, K.M (1966) Marriage and Family in India, Oxford University Press, Bombay. Shah, Ghanshyam (1998) Social Movements in India, Sage Publication, Delhi. Shiva, V. (1991) Ecology and Politics of Survival, UN University Press and Sage Publications: New Delhi. Das. Veena (ed.) (2004) Handbook of Indian Sociology, Oxford University Press, New Delhi. Leonard, P (1966) Sociology in Social Work, Routledge. Ritzer, G (2011) Sociological Theory, Fifth Edition, Tata McGRAW Hill-Rawat Publication, New Delhi. Rosemarie T (2009) An Introduction to Feminist thought. West View Press.

Semester I Course: MSW-102 Personality Development and Dynamics of Behaviour

Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To understand the basic concepts and processes of personality development b) To develop understanding of theories of personality development and capacity to critically analyze their relevance in the Indian context c) To understand theories of socialization, culture, attitude and prejudice formation d) To understand and engage with issues of mental health and disorder and their relevance to social work practice Course Outline Unit: I Life Course Perspective a) b) c) d)

Personality and Personality Development: Meaning and Concept Importance of Heredity and Environment: Context and Debate Theories of Personality: Freud, Eric Erikson, Piaget and Kohlberg Behaviourism and Social Learning Theory: Skinner and Albert Bandura, Vygotsky, Colonialism and Indian Personality: Ashish Nandy,

Unit: II Socialization a) b) c) d)

Agencies and Types of Socialization, Parenting Cultural and Socialization: Concepts, Caste, Class, Gender, Ethnicity and Religion Social Psychology: Attitude formation, Prejudice and Stereotypes and Discrimination Motivation, Attribution and Perceptions

Unit: III Mental Health a) Debate of Normalcy and Abnormality b) Mental Health and Mental Illness c) Social Construction of Disability and different types of disabilities d) Community Mental Health

Assessment -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading List: 1. Berk, Laura (2009) Child Social Development in Richer A Shweder (ed.) the ChildEncyclopedia Companion, Chicago University Press.

2. Hutchison, E (2007) Dimensions of Human Behaviour: Changing Life Course, Sage Publication New Delhi. 3. Nandy, A (2004) Bonfire of Creeds, Oxford University Press, New Delhi. 4. Balakrishnan Vijaylakshmi (2011) Growing Up and Away: Narratives of Indian Childhood: Memory History and Identity, Oxford University Press, New Delhi. 5. Saraswati, T.S (2003) Cross-Cultural Perspective in Human Development: Theory, Research and Application, Sage Publication, New Delhi

Semester I Course: MSW-103 Working with Individuals

Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To learn the basic concepts and processes of working with individuals b) To understand the theoretical frameworks for working with individuals in social work practice c) To develop capacity to build praxis of theory to practice for working with individuals Course Outline Unit: I Understanding Individual and Society a) b) c) d)

Definitions and concepts. Individual differences and needs. Enhancing people’s capacity to solve problems. Empowering processes in working with individuals.

Unit: II Working with individuals: Processes and practise a) b) c) d)

Assumptions, objectives and principles Processes and components of working with individuals Communication skills for effective case work practice Tools for working with individuals, Ethical dilemmas

Unit: III Theories and Approaches to working with Individuals a) b) c) d)

Ecological Perspective Client-Centred Approach Behavioural Modification Anti-Oppressive Approach

Assessment -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading List:

1. Mathew, G (1993) An Introduction to Social Case Work, TISS, Mumbai 2. Perlman, H,H (1957) Social Case Work: A problem Solving Process, Chicago University Press, Chicago 3. Hamilton, G. (1951) Theory and Practice in Social Case Work, Columbia University Press, New York 4. Richmond, M (1965) Social Case Work: A Problem Solving Approach, Chicago University Press, Chicago. 5. Roberts and Nee, (eds.) (1970) Theories of Social Work, Chicago University Press, Chicago. 6. Fook, Jan (1993) Radical Case Work: A Theory of Practice, Allen and Unwin

Semester I

Course: MSW-104 Concurrent Field Work (Field Lab) Rationale for Field Work Theory provides the perspective and information base to understand the socio-political, economic and cultural contexts, within which human societies interact, engage and strive to create better living conditions. The classroom provides this theoretical knowledge and understanding which forms the foundation and core areas of social work. Field work ensures the development of competence in social work practice because ‘knowing’ does not automatically result in the ability to ‘do’ or to ‘feel’ which is essential for professional development. Fieldwork is the ‘learning by doing’ aspect of social work education and an integral part of the total curriculum. Fieldwork plays a pivotal role and provides the experimental basis for the student’s academic programme. It offers an environment within which students are given an opportunity to develop a coherent framework for social work practice by integrating and reinforcing the knowledge acquired in the classroom with actual practice. It also enables students to acquire and test relevant practice skills. First year field instruction, in particular, aims at developing capacities among the students which can be broadly explained as: 1. A capacity to interact and intervene with people (individuals, groups, communities and institutions) consciously and purposefully 2. An ability to analyse structural issues from the viewpoint of the poor, marginalised and vulnerable sections 3. A readiness to recognise structural and social processes that shape individual, social and institutional relations 4. An ability to identify constituencies and stakeholders for intervention with reference to specific issues 5. A capacity to examine concepts and think critically about classroom learning and field of practice i.e. praxis and reflectivity from a pro-poor stance integral to social work. Objectives for First Year Field Work: a) To develop a holistic view of social work and related interventions in the community, with special emphasis on the agency’s role in human services b) Understanding the Agency set up in socio-political context, its genesis, vision, mission, objectives, structure, programmes and outreach. c) Understanding the problems and opportunities in working with diverse populations d) Develop an understanding of the application of methods of social work practice in the field e) Develop practice skills appropriate to each phase of the change process and apply them in direct work with people and communities f) Develop the self-awareness necessary to assess one’s own values, attitudes, feelings, strengths, limitations, interests and performance g) Understanding the Community and Community dynamics Field work is going to be concurrent and students are required to put in 12hrs per week in the field. The recommended days for field work are Fridays and Saturdays. The students can be placed in nearby non-government organisations working in local communities, urban or rural. Role of student:

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The student will maintain a detailed daily log which comprises of the work done in a day for 6hrs. The student will submit a detailed report to the assigned Field Supervisor for each day’s work which shares details of work done, analysis (theory and practice), reflection of learning by self and next day’s work plan. The student will meet the Field Work Supervisor once every week for Consultation and sharing. The students will be granted leave only in the case of personal emergencies for maximum two days. In case they take leave for more than two days they will need to put in extra hours of work to cover the time lost. In case this is not done field work will not be considered complete and grades will not be awarded to the student.

Role of Field Supervisor    

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Every Faculty supervisor will have six to seven students placed with them for field supervision every year which include both first and second year students. Organization of student learning- The Field Supervisor is responsible for workload allocation to ensure that the student has sufficient number and variety of tasks to accomplish the objectives of the education plan. The Field Supervisor is accountable to the managing committee or head of agency for the work undertaken by the student. He /She also has the task of communication and interpretation of agency structure and policies with the students. Individual Conference and Evaluation-The Field Supervisor facilitates self-directed learning by the student. A basic method in field instruction is the Individual Conference. Fieldwork supervisors need to provide dedicated time to the student each week. Another educational responsibility is the assessment of the student’s performance, in terms of his/her progress in the field of learning social work perspectives and skills. With the emphasis on participatory learning and consistent interaction between the Field Supervisor and the student. Field Supervisor in the first semester must engage with the student in the field to demonstrate and support the student regarding social work practice. Before placing students the Social Work Faculty should be visiting the organisations verify the capacity and willingness of the organisation to anchor students.

Semester I Course: MSW-105 Foundation of Social Work Education Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours

Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) Understand the ideology vis-à-vis emergence of Social Work Profession in socio-political context b) To develop an understanding of the theoretical approach for social work practice. c) To understand the contemporary social work practice/profession. Course Outline Unit I Emergence and History of Social Work a) b) c) d)

Unit II a) b) c) d)

Context of emergence of Social Work Education in the West Context of emergence of Social Work Education in India Human Rights and Social Work Profession Emerging trends in Social Work Profession – International Social Work

Social Work as a Profession Functions of Professional Social Worker Basic assumptions and Principles of Social Work Ethics and Values in Social Work Practice Competencies in Social Work Practice

Unit III Theoretical Approaches to Social Work a) System theory b) Critical theory c) Evidence based practice d) Indigenous perspective

Assessment: -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading List: 1. Skidmore, et al (1991): Introduction to Social Work, New Jersey: Prentice Hall 2. Pathak, S. H. (1981): Social Welfare: An Evolutionary and Development Perspective, New Delhi: MacMillan Publications 3. Morales and Sheafor (1989): Social Work: A Profession of Many Faces, 5th edition, Boston: Allyn and Bacon

4. Encyclopedia of Social Work, NASW. 5. Roberts and Nee (Ed) (1970): Theories of Social Work, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press 6. Bradford, S.W. (2003): Techniques and Guidelines for Social Work Practice, 6th Edition, London: Pearson Education Inc.

Semester I

Course: MSW-106 Communication Skills

(To be cross listed across the University with M.A (English) Programme)

&

Course: MSW-107 Computer Skills & Applications (To be cross listed with M.A (Computer Science) Programme)

Assessment:

-

Individual Assessment Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Semester II Course: MSW-201 Working with Groups Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours

Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To learn the concepts and theories of practice for working with groups b) To develop skills and capacity to engage and work with groups in different settings c) To learn to analyze and develop praxis skills for group work in social work practice Course Outline Unit I Understanding Groups (a) (b) (c) (d)

Definitions and significance of groups Types of groups Use of Programme Media in working with groups Social Group Work: Method of Social Work and Scope

Unit II Process and Dynamics of Group Formation (a) (b) (c) (d)

Stages of group formation ( pre-group, initial, middle and termination) Group Dynamics and Conflict Group Structures Principles of working with groups

Unit III Theories of Groups (a) (b) (c) (d)

Psychodynamic Theories and Behaviourist Theories Conflict Theories Gestalt and Field Theories Models of Group Work

Assessment -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading List: 1. Corey G. (1981) Theory and Practice of Group Counselling: Brooks/ Cole Publishing Company: California. USA.

2. Corsini, R. J. (2004): Current Psycho Therapies with Case Studies, Hawaii: Wadsworth Publications. 3. Dominelli, Adams et al (eds) (2002) Critical Social Work Practice. Palgrave Publications: New York. USA. 4. Johnson, D & Johnson, F.(1987) Joining Together-Group Theory and Group Skills. Prentice Hall: New Jersey. 5. Konopka,G. (1983): Social Group Work: A Helping Process, 3rd Edition, New Jersey: Prentice Hall International. 6. Siddique, H. (2008) Group Work Theories and Practice. Rawat Publications. Jaipur 7. Toseland and Rivas (1955) An Introduction to Group Work Practice, Boston: Allyn and Bacon. 8. Trecker,H.B (1948) Social Group Work: Principles and Practice, New York: Woman’s Press 9. Turner, F (2000) Social Work Treatment, Fourth Edition, The Free Press: New York 10. Wilson, G and Raylands, G. (1989): Social Group Practices, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin

Semester-II Course: MSW-202 Working with Communities Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits

Objectives: a) To understand the concept of community and community work practice. b) To identify the community needs and community dynamics for community work practice. c) To create community awareness and mobilization and implement community programme planning and resource mobilization. d) To use different techniques, tools and models of community participation. Course Outline Unit: I Understanding Community (a) (b) (c) (d)

Communities: Concept, Types, Characteristics and Issues Community Work: Need, Assumptions and Principles Community Work: Approaches and Perspectives Models of Community Work

Unit: II Process of Community Work (a) (b) (c) (d)

Community Awareness and Mobilization: Meaning, Concept and Settings Community Dynamics: Concepts, Nature and Relevance Community Need Identification: Concept, Process and Techniques Community Programme Planning and Resource Mobilization

Unit: III Participatory Community Work (a) (b) (c) (d)

Social Action: Concept, Types, Theories and Models Social Action and Social Movements: Relevance and Strategies Community Participation: Concept, Needs, Types, Levels and Challenges Participatory Learning and Action(PLA): Principles, Methods, Tools and Importance

Assessment -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading List: 1. Ross, M.G. (1967) Community Organization: Theory, Principles and Practice, Harper and Row 2. Siddique, H.Y. (1996) Community and Social Action 3. Chambers, R (1992) Rural Appraisal: Rapid, Relaxed and Participatory, Institute of Development Studies, Sussex

4. Meenai, Z (2007) Participatory Community Work, Concept, New Delhi

Semester-II Course: MSW-203. Development, Displacement and Forced Migration Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits

Objectives: (a) Developing students’ critical and analytical skills to comprehend the complexities underlying development and practice. (b) Facilitating critical engagement of students with contemporary developmental processes and concerns. (c) To understand the development challenges and possibilities of practice Course Outline Unit I Development Paradigms and Debates (a) (b) (c) (d)

Conflicting paradigms of development, shifts in development thinking Debate on Development and Underdevelopment Alternative Development Paradigms – Concept and Debate Alternative Development Paradigm: Right to Development, Sustainable Development, Participatory Development, Women, Gender and Development

Unit II Contemporary Processes of Development: Displacement, Forced Migration and Marginalisation (a) Development Realms and Vulnerabilities: Key Social, Cultural, Economic and Political concerns of vulnerable communities in India (b) Development Processes and Projects: Nature, Impact and Displacement (c) Forced Migration: Issues, concerns and vulnerabilities (d) Forced Migration: Case Studies

Unit III Development Challenges and possibilities of practice (a) Understanding Peoples’ Agency: A critical concept for understanding impoverishment, resistance and scope for practice (b) Context of Practice with poor, marginalised and vulnerable communities (c) Critical review of practice: Case studies of field responses and challenges (d) Development Challenges and Social Work Practice Assessment -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading List: 1. Sachs, Wolfgang (ed.). (1992) The Development Dictionary. London: Zed Books. 2. Rai M. Shirin. (2008) The Gender Politics of Development: Essays in hope and despair. New Delhi: Zubaan (an imprint of Kali for Women). 3. Sen Amartya. (2000) Development as Freedom. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

4. Parasuraman S et al. (2003) Listening to people living in poverty. Bangalore: Books for Change. 5. Sengupta Arjun. (2000) Realizing the Right to Development in Development and Change,Vol. 31: 553-78. 6. Willis, K. (2006) Theories and Practices of Development. London: Routledge. 7. Apffel –Marglin, Kumar and Mishra (ed.). (2010) Interrogating Development: Insights from the Margins. New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 8. Gita Sen and Caren Grown. (1987) Development Crises and Alternative Visions. USA: Monthly Review Press.

Semester II Course: MSW-204 Social Work Research

Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To understand and appreciate the nature, process, and role of Quantitative and Qualitative Methods of research in the field of Social Work. b) To develop practice-based research skills, knowledge, and values required to undertake quantitative and qualitative research studies in the field of Social Work. Course Outline Unit I Nature of quantitative research methodology (a) Characteristics, process, assumptions, and values. (b) Role and scope of quantitative research methods (c) The Process of Quantitative Research: Conceptualizations, Designing quantitative studies, Methods and tools of data collection, (d) Data processing techniques, Analysis of data, reporting the results of quantitative research Unit II Nature of qualitative research methodology (a) Characteristics, process, assumptions, and values. (b) Types, roles, and scope of various methods under qualitative research methodology. (c) The Process of Qualitative Research – Conceptualizing, Designing qualitative studies, Methods of data collection, (d) Data processing, analyses and Writing qualitative research report Unit III Nature and Linkages (a) (b) (c) (d)

Quantitative Research and Social Work Practice Identifying their linkages with the development of Social Work knowledge. Qualitative Research and Social Work Practice Qualitative research and working towards the development of field-based theory.

Assessment

-

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading List: 1. Atkinson, P.(1990) The Ethnographic Imagination: Textual constructions of reality. New York: Routledge.

2. Becker, Howard, S. (1978) The Relevance of Life Histories”. In Norman K. Denzin (ed.): Sociological Methods: A Source Book (second edition) New York: Mcgraw-Hill Book Company. 3. Bryman, Alan, (1988) Quantity and Quality in Social Research. London: Unwin Hyman Ltd. 4. Denzin, N. and Lincoln, Y. (1997) Handbook of Qualitative Research. London: SAGE Publications. 5. Filstead, William J. (ed.) (1970) Qualitative Methodology: Firsthand Involvement with the Social World. Chicago: Markham Publishing Company. 6. Mahtani, Rajshree P. (2004) Application of Qualitative Research Methodology for Developing Social Work Practice Models. The Indian Journal of Social Work, 65(1), pp. 6083.

Semester II Course: MSW-205 Concurrent Field Work

Rationale for Field Work Theory provides the perspective and information base to understand the socio-political, economic and cultural contexts, within which human societies interact, engage and strive to create better living conditions. The classroom provides this theoretical knowledge and understanding which forms the foundation and core areas of social work. Field work ensures the development of competence in social work practice because ‘knowing’ does not automatically result in the ability to ‘do’ or to ‘feel’ which is essential for professional development. Fieldwork is the ‘learning by doing’ aspect of social work education and an integral part of the total curriculum. Fieldwork plays a pivotal role and provides the experimental basis for the student’s academic programme. It offers an environment within which students are given an opportunity to develop a coherent framework for social work practice by integrating and reinforcing the knowledge acquired in the classroom with actual practice. It also enables students to acquire and test relevant practice skills. First year field instruction, in particular, aims at developing capacities among the students which can be broadly explained as: 1. A capacity to interact and intervene with people (individuals, groups, communities and institutions) consciously and purposefully 2. An ability to analyse structural issues from the viewpoint of the poor, marginalised and vulnerable sections 3. A readiness to recognise structural and social processes that shape individual, social and institutional relations 4. An ability to identify constituencies and stakeholders for intervention with reference to specific issues 5. A capacity to examine concepts and think critically about classroom learning and field of practice i.e. praxis and reflectivity from a pro-poor stance integral to social work. Objectives for First Year Field Work: a) To develop a holistic view of social work and related interventions in the community, with special emphasis on the agency’s role in human services b) Understanding the Agency set up in socio-political context, its genesis, vision, mission, objectives, structure, programmes and outreach. c) Understanding the problems and opportunities in working with diverse populations d) Develop an understanding of the application of methods of social work practice in the field e) Develop practice skills appropriate to each phase of the change process and apply them in direct work with people and communities f) Develop the self-awareness necessary to assess one’s own values, attitudes, feelings, strengths, limitations, interests and performance g) Understanding the Community and Community dynamics Field work is going to be concurrent and students are required to put in 12hrs per week in the field. The recommended days for field work are Fridays and Saturdays. The students can be placed in nearby non-government organisations working in local communities, urban or rural. Role of student:

 

 

The student will maintain a detailed daily log which comprises of the work done in a day for 6hrs. The student will submit a detailed report to the assigned Field Supervisor for each day’s work which shares details of work done, analysis (theory and practice), reflection of learning by self and next day’s work plan. The student will meet the Field Work Supervisor once every week for Consultation and sharing. The students will be granted leave only in the case of personal emergencies for maximum two days. In case they take leave for more than two days they will need to put in extra hours of work to cover the time lost. In case this is not done field work will not be considered complete and grades will not be awarded to the student.

Role of Field Supervisor    

 

Every Faculty supervisor will have six to seven students placed with them for field supervision every year which include both first and second year students. Organization of student learning- The Field Supervisor is responsible for workload allocation to ensure that the student has sufficient number and variety of tasks to accomplish the objectives of the education plan. The Field Supervisor is accountable to the managing committee or head of agency for the work undertaken by the student. He /She also has the task of communication and interpretation of agency structure and policies with the students. Individual Conference and Evaluation-The Field Supervisor facilitates self-directed learning by the student. A basic method in field instruction is the Individual Conference. Fieldwork supervisors need to provide dedicated time to the student each week. Another educational responsibility is the assessment of the student’s performance, in terms of his/her progress in the field of learning social work perspectives and skills. With the emphasis on participatory learning and consistent interaction between the Field Supervisor and the student. Field Supervisor in the first semester must engage with the student in the field to demonstrate and support the student regarding social work practice. Before placing students the Social Work Faculty should be visiting the organisations verify the capacity and willingness of the organisation to anchor students.

Semester II Course: MSW-206 Workshop and Seminar on Skill Development Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits

Objectives of the Course: a) To acquaint students about the skills required to practice Social Work. b) To understand the relevance of soft skills such as Programme media, Communication, Crisis intervention, Life Skills and Organizational Culture and Management for Social Work Practice c) To develop students potentials to handle various issues with skill development. Course Outline: To fulfill course requirement the Five (5) topics mentioned below shall be covered through Day long Workshop/Seminars by the experts from the fields. a) b) c) d) e)

Programme Media and Social Work Communication Skills Crisis Intervention Life Skills and Social Work Organizational Culture and Management

Assessment -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Course: MSW-207 Rural Practicum/Camp Objectives of the Course (a) To facilitate knowledge and understanding of students about rural life situation, rurality through exposure to Indian villages

(b) To enable students to critically examine rural poverty, rural social structure and its impact marginalized sections based on caste, class, gender, ethnicity and religion. (c) To understand governance structures, role and functions in village administration. (d) To understand the outreach of various states led programmes like ICDS, MGNREGA, NRHM, SSA and others. (e) To engage the self and develop sensitivity and basic understanding of issues in rural India. The rural practicum is a part of the 2credit course in the Second semester. It comprises of theory inputs on rural life, rurality, rural governance structures and childhoods. The theory inputs are followed by a Ten (10) days practicum in a rural locality usually through an organization working in that area. The students are facilitated to organise all logistics and work as a team. The rural practicum enables the students to understand the vulnerabilities and marginalisation that emerge due to loss of livelihoods, migration, displacement in rural areas, as well as contextualise childhoods within the axis of social stratifiers of caste, gender, tribe, ethnicity and disability. Assessment Individual assessment through assignments- 60% Individual presentations in Class-40% Reading List  Breman, Jan.2007. Wishing Away Poverty. The Jan Breman Omnibus. Oxford University Press, New Delhi.  R.N. Prasad, 2002.Governance of India: Issues and Perspectives, New Delhi, Concept Publishing Company.  D. Bandyopadhyay and Amitava Mukherjee (Eds.). 2004. New Issues in Panchayati Raj, New Delhi, Concept Publishing House, 2004.  A Cigno, F C Rosati, Z,Tzannatos.2001. Child Labour,Nutrition and Education in Rural India:An Economic Analysis of Parental Choice and Policy Options. World Bank Report.  Sivaramakrishnan K &Gidwani Vinay. 2003. Circular migration and rural cosmopolitanism in India. Contributions to Indian Sociology, 37: 339  Banerji, D. (2005). Politics of Rural Health. Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 40, No. 30 (Jul. 23-29), pp. 3253-3258  Sivaramakrishnan K &Gidwani Vinay. 2003. Circular migration and rural cosmopolitanism in India.  Contributions to Indian Sociology, 2003, 37: 339  Madelene Ostwald and Ranjan Baral. (2000). Local Forest Protection, Gender and Caste: Dhani  Hill, Orissa, India. Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, Vol. 82, No. 3 (2000), pp.115-128  Robert Hughes, Jr. (1987). Empowering Rural Families and Communities. Family Relations, Vol.  Rural Families: Stability and Change (Oct., 1987), 36, No. 4, pp.396-401  MGNREGS. GOI Document  NRHM Mission Document 2005 Assessment Pattern for Field Work M.A. (Social Work) Semester-I

S.No.

Criteria

MARKS

1.

Professional development

25

2.

Field tasks

30

3.

Values & attitudinal change

25

4.

Recordings

10

5.

Use of supervision

10

Total

100

M.A. (Social Work) Semester-II S.No.

Criteria

MARKS

1.

Professional development

25

2.

Field tasks

30

3.

Values & attitudinal change

25

4.

Recordings

10

5.

Use of supervision

10

6.

Rural camp/study tour

50

7

Viva voce

50

Total

200

Semester III Course: MSW-301 NGO Management

Total Teaching Hours: 30 hour Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To understand voluntary sector on Development b) To understand the legal framework and implications of transparency and accountability. c) To acquire appropriate attitude and skills for management of NGOs. Course Outline Unit I Voluntary Sector in Development a) b) c) d)

Nomenclature: Definition, Typology Role of Voluntary sectors in development in Democracy. Regulation for Voluntary organization NGO: Formulation of Societies, Trusts, Non-Profit Companies

Unit-II Legal framework of NGO (a) Registration of Societies 1860, Trust Act 1952, Companies Act 1956 (Sec 25),Rajasthan Act 1958 (b) Memorandum of Association (c) Resource Mobilization :FCRA, Income Tax, other related regulation (d) Governance: Societies, Trust and Companies Unit III Management of NGO (a) (b) (c) (e)

POSTCORB Accountability, transparency and sustainability Project Management and Conditions of Donors Financial Management, NGO rating and HR Development

Assessment -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading list:

1. Brown, Andrew (1970) Management Development and MBO, Sonalaya Publications, Bombay. 2. Chandra, Snehalata(2003) Guidelines for NGOs Management in India, Kanishka Publishers,New Delhi. 3. Champers. R(1994) Readings in Human Relations, Mc Graw Hill Book. 4. Davis, Keith(1994) The Origins and Practice of Participatory Rural Appraisal, World Bank. 5. Lewis & Wallace(2000) New Roles and Relevance: Development of NGOs and Challenge of change, Kumarian PressChennai. 6. Samuel, Paul(2000) Managing Development Programmes, The Lessons of Success, Boulder Co West ViewPress, Washington. 7. Padaki & Manjulika(2005) Management Development in Non-Profit Organisation, Sage Publications, New Delhi 8. Publication Division ( 2000) India: A Reference Manual, New Delhi, Ministry Of Boradcasting. 9. Roy, Sam. M (2002) Project planning and Management focusing on Proposal writing, CHAI, Secunderabad. 10. Sen, Amartya( 2005) Human Rights and Human Development, UNDP Human Development Report. 11. www.karmyog.com

Semester III Course: MSW-302 Development Management

Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To understand issues arising from debates on development. b) To understand role of social planning in development without deprivation. c) To acquire skills and tools for engagement in development without deprivation. Course Outline Unit: I Development Planning: An Indian Experiences

a) Context and trends in development planning b) Five year plan- Non-plan and levels of development planning c) Financial development plan: Finance commission and planning commission role in development planning

d) Challenges faced in developing and implementing intervention Unit: II Development Management a) Issues arising from development debates b) Models of development management: PPP, Build own transfer(BOT),Build Operation own transfer(BUT), Special Economic Zone(SEZ) c) People’s participation and accountability. d) Management of resistance Unit: III Development project planning and management a) Concept, processes and techniques b) Tools: Social Impact Assessment, Gender Impact Assessment and Environmental impact assessment c) Evaluation: Techniques and Tools d) Planning Evaluation Review Techniques (PERT), Critical Path Matrics (CPM). Assessment -

Individual Assessment through Internal Test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading lists: 1. Brett, T. (2000) ‘Understanding organizations and institutions’, in Robinson, D., Hewitt, T. and Harriss, T. (eds.) Managing Development: Understanding Inter-

2.

3.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. 11.

12.

13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

18. 19.

organizational Relationships, London, Sage Publications in association with the Open University. Thomas, A. (1996) ‘What is development management?’ Journal of International Development, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 95–110. World Vision International (2006) website online at www.worldvision.org.uk (accessed 21 May 2008). Thomas, A. and Allen, T. (2000) ‘Agencies of development’ in Allen, T. and Thomas, A. (eds)Poverty and Development into the 21st Century, Oxford, Oxford University Press and the Open University, pp. 189–218. Thomas, A. (2000) ‘Poverty and the “end of development”’ in Allen, T. and Thomas, A. (eds)Poverty and Development into the 21st Century, Oxford, Oxford University Press and the Open University, pp. 345–364. World Bank (2003) World Development Report 2003: Sustainable Development in a Dynamic World, Washington D.C., World Bank. Chapman, J. (2002) ‘Monitoring and evaluating advocacy’, PLA Notes (International Institute for Environment and Development), Vol. 43, pp. 48–52. Coates, B. and David, R. (2002) ‘Learning for change: the art of assessing the impact of advocacy work’, Development in Practice, vol. 12, no. 3 and 4, pp. 530–41. Hanlon, J. (2007) ‘Grabbing attention’, in Thomas, A. and Mohan, G. (eds), Research Skills for Policy and Development, London, SAGE Publications, pp. 72–92. .Mackintosh, M. (1992) ‘Introduction’, in Wuyts, M., Mackintosh, M. and Hewitt, T. (eds)Development Policy and Public Action, Oxford, Oxford University Press in association with The Open University. Tearfund (2002) Advocacy toolkit: Understanding advocacy, online at tilz.tearfund.org (accessed 28 April 2008). Bebbington, A. and Riddell, R. (1997) ‘Heavy hands, hidden hands, holding hands? Donors, intermediary NGOs and civil society organizations’, in Hulme, D. and Edwards, M. (eds.) NGOs, States and Donors. Too Close for Comfort?, London, Macmillan in association with Save the Children. .Brett, T. (2000) ‘Understanding organizations and institutions’, in Managing Development, Chapter 2 in Robinson, D., Hewitt, T. and Harriss, T. (eds.) Managing Development: Understanding Inter-organizational Relationships, London, Sage Publications in association with the Open University. Freire, P. (1972) Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Harmondsworth, Penguin, pp. 135–150. .Howell, J. and Pearce, J. (2001) Civil Society and Development, London, Lynne Rienner Publishers Long, N. (2004) ‘Contesting policy ideas from below’, in Bøås, M., and McNeill, D. (eds.) Global Institutions and Development, London, Routledge .Rahnema, M. (1992) ‘Participation’, in Sachs, W. (ed.) The Development Dictionary. A Guide to Knowledge and Power, London and New Jersey, Zed Books Ltd., pp. Robinson, D., Hewitt, T. and Harriss, J. (2000) ‘Why inter-organisational relationships matter’, in Robinson, D., Hewitt, T. and Harriss, J. (eds) Managing Development, London, SAGE Publications in association with the Open University. Uphoff, N. (1986) Local Institutional Development: an Analytical Sourcebook, West Hartford, Connecticut, Kumarian Press. Whetten, D.A and Cameron, K.S. (1993) Developing management skills: managing conflict, New York, HarperCollins.

Semester III Course: MSW-303 Women, Gender and Social Work Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours

Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) Develop familiarity with the current social status of women in India. b) Develop an understanding of the causes that affect the current status of women. c) Understand constitutional and institutional safeguards available for women. d) To develop sensitivity and skills for improving status of women Course Outline Unit-I Gender as a Social Construct a) Sex and Gender: Conceptual Framework b) Gender Based Identity and Discrimination c) Women’s Movement: National and International Context d) Gender Studies: Concept, Need and Scope Unit-II Women Issues and Challenges a) Women: Education and Health b) Women at the Workplace: Organized and Unorganized Sector c) Women: Political Participation and Marginalization d) Women and Violence Unit-III Women: Constitutional and Institutional Safeguards a) UN Convention on Women’s b) Indian Constitution and Legal Provision for welfare and development of women c) Schemes, Programmes and Institutional mechanism for women d) Women: Civil Society and Social Work Assessment: - Individual Assessment through Internal Test- 40% - Individual attendance and Presentation in Class- 10% - Semester End Examination- 50%

Reading List: 1. Desai, Murli. (1994) Family and Intervention: A Course Compendium. Mumbai: TISS. 2. Eagleton, M. (2000) A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Maiden: Blackwell 3. Hegarty, Seamus, Alur, Mithu. (2002) Education and Children with Special Needs: From

Segregation to Inclusion. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Sage Publications. 4. Human Development Centre (Islamabad, Pakistan). (2000), Human Development in South Asia: The Gender 5. Krishna, S. (2004) Livelihood and Gender. New Delhi: Sage Publications. 6. Mathur, K. (2004) Countering Gender Violence. New Delhi: Sage Publications. 7. Srivastva, Sushma,(2008) Women Empowerment, Commonwealth Publishers, New Delhi 8. Verma, R.B.S. et.al (2006) Empowermnet of Weaker Sectors in India, Serials Publications, New Delhi 9. Verma, R.B.S.et.al (2009) Study of Womens Problem in India, Serials Publications, New Delhi 10. Kalyani, Menon Sen , A.K.Shiv Kumar,(2001) Women in India- How Free? , How Equal? , Report Commissioned by the Office of Resident Coordinator in India, U.N.

Semester III Course: MSW-304 Social Welfare Administration

Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To understand the concept of welfare state and implication. b) To understand Social Welfare system in India (Legislation). c) To develop appropriate attitudinal skill necessary for implementing social welfare programmes. Course Outline Unit-I Welfare State a) b) c) d)

Concept, Scope and changes Ideologies, models and approaches Structure and functions Role of Human Rights Commission, SC,ST,OBC, Minorities and Information Commission

Unit-II Social Legislations a) b) c) d)

Social Legislation: Meaning, Scope and Importance Current legislation Implementation machinery Role of Social Worker in delivery of welfare services/benefits

Unit-III: Designing Welfare Programmes a) b) c) d)

Universal target approach Divisible and indivisible benefits Designing delivery machinery Peoples participation in monitoring and delivery system

Assessment -

Individual assessment through internal test- 40% Individual attendance and presentations in Class-10% Semester End Examination- 50%

Reading List:

1. 2. 3. 4.

Bose, A.B.(1970) Social Welfare Planning in India, New Delhi Ecafe. Chopra, R.K.( 1981) Office Organization and Management, Bombay, Himalaya Choudry, P(1979) Social Welfare Administration, New Delhi, Atman Ram and Sons. Devi Laxmi(1993) Encyclopedia of Women’s Development and Family Welfare (Vol.I-V), Lucknow, Anmol. 5. Gangrade,K.D( 1978) Social Legislation in India(Vol.I-III), Delhi, Concept. 6. Goel,S.L.and Jain,R.K.(1998) Social Welfare Administration Vol. I & II. New Delhi Deep and Deep 7. Kulkarni,P.D.(1996) The Central Social Welfare Board,New Delhi, Asia. 8. Paul Choudry( 1996) Voluntary Social Welfare in India, New Delhi, Sterling. 9. Rameswari Devei (1998). Social Work and Social Welfare Administration: & Ravi Prakash methods and practice(Vol.I-II), Jaipur, Mandal Deep 10. Sachdeva D.R.(1993) Social Welfare Administration in India,Allahabad, Kitab Mahal 11. Shukla, M.C. (1983 )Office Organization & Management, New Delshi, S.Chand 12. Government of India(1969) Report of the Committee on Untouchability, New Delhi. 13. Government of India (1969) Economics and Educational Development of the Schduled Castes, New Delhi. 14. Government of India (1971) Report of Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes Commissioner, New Delhi. 15. Government of India( 1976) Report of the Advisory Committee on the Revision of lists of Schduled Caste and Schduled Tribes, New Delhi. 16. Government of India, Constitution of Indian Government. Indian Press, New Delhi. Bare Acts and Legislations: (i). Encyclopedia of Social Work. (ii). The Hindu Maraiage Act, 1955. (iii). The Hindu Succession Act, 1956. (vi). The Hindu Adoption & Maintenance Act,1956. (v). The Hindu Minority & Guradianship Act, 1956. (vi). The Untouchabiity offences Act, 1955. (vii). The Dowry abolition Act,1961. (viii). Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act, 1971.

Semester III

Course: MSW-305 Block Field Work Total Teaching Hours: 240 hours Total Credits: 16 credits Objectives: a) To understand the organization, its structure, philosophy and its work b) To understand the organization culture and management pattern. c) To acquire appropriate attitudinal skills for implementing intervention strategies by the organization. Structure: - Institutional/Organizational Set up - Relevance of Social Work Practice in Organization set up - Weekly Individual Conferences through skype - Attendance: 25 working days in Semester - Field Work Days: Continuous 25 working days from the date of commencement - Leave: Leave observed by the organization and leave due to unavoidable circumstances

Specific Task of Block Placement: -

Participating in the routine activities of the organization and identify the scope for social work intervention Understand the organization set-up, target groups and implementation process of the organization Understand the dynamics, decision making pattern, leadership style, communication processes and documentation pattern of the organization Understand the level and areas of organization effectiveness and development Detailed profiling of institution and organization set up.

Assessment S.No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 4.

Criteria Professional Development Field Tasks Values and Attitude Recordings Use of Supervision Total

Marks 25 30 15 15 15 100

Semester IV

Course: MSW- 401 Policy, Law and Governance Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) Understand the concept and public policy formulation processes. b) Understand the nature and scope of law and policy making processes c) To Understand the role of Social Work in Governance Course Outline Unit: I Policy Processes a) b) c) d)

Policy: Definition, changing concept, sources, Scope and Processes Models of policy formulation including Stakeholders participation Policy makers: Primary, secondary and tertiary Policy Analysis, Review and Alternate reporting, influencing policy-Advocacy and Networking

Unit: II Law a) b) c) d)

Concept of Social Justice Indian Constitution: Fundamental Rights and Directive Principal of State Policy Working of Constitution Sectoral laws

Unit: III Governance a) Governance: Concept and trends b) Governance Issues: Transparency, Accountability , Efficiency & Indicators c) Approaches and Models of Governance d) Governance and Social Work Practice Assessment -

Individual assessment through Internal test: 40% Individual Presentation & attendance: 10% End semester Examination: 50%

Reading List:

1. Amy, Douglas j.(1984). “ why policy Analysis and Ethics are incompatible.” Journal of Public Analysis and Management.Vol.3,No.4(Summer).pp.573-591 2. Anderson, James E (2004). Public Policy Making, Houghton, New York 3.Austin, Granville(1966) The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation, New Delhi: Oxford university press. 4. Austin, Granville(1999) Working a Democratic constitution, New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 5. Hasan Zoya et. Al.(2002), eds, India’s living constitution: Ideas, practices, controversies, New Delhi: permanent Black. 6. Jenkins, Rob and Anne Marie Goetz.(1999). Accounts and Accountability: Theoretical implications of the right to information movement in India in Third World Quarterly, vol.20, No.3. 7. Chandhoke, Neera( 1995) , State and Civil Society: Explorations in political Theory, sage, New Delhi 8. Ayyar, Vaidyantha( 2009), Public policy making in India , person, New Delhi 9. Dye, Thomas( 1987) , Understanding Public Policy, prentice Hall Inc, New Jersey. 10. Hand Book on Governance(2010), Sage Publication.

Semester-IV

Course: MSW-402 Block Field Work Total Teaching Hours: 240 hours Total Credits: 16 credits Objectives: a) To understand the intervention strategies of the organization in the context of target group issues. b) To understand the interface between the organizations and regulatory board c) To acquire necessary attitude and skills to manage interface between interface between organization and stakeholders d) To acquire skills for conducting systematic research/systematic analysis and programme formulation e) To learn networking for issue based advocacy. Structure: - Institutional/Organizational Set up - Relevance of Social Work Practice in Organization set up - weekly Individual Conferences - Attendance: 30 working days in Semester - Field Work Days: Continuous 30 working days from the date of commencement - Leave: Leave observed by the organization and leave due to unavoidable circumstances Specific Task of Block Placement: - Participating in routine organization and identify the scope for social work intervention - Understand the organization set-up, target groups and implementation process of the organization - Strengthening the skills of networking and coordinating with other agencies working in the similar field. - Getting in-depth knowledge of social action, social activism and integrated social work practice - Participating in the lobbying, networking and advocacy of the agency to gain an understanding on these front - Understand programme formulation, management and implementation process - Design and Conduct research project/situationl analysis on the target group/areas of organization - To understand Information Brochure, Annual Report, Changing memorandum if necessary. Assessment: S.No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 4. 5. 6.

Criteria Professional Development Field Tasks Values and Attitude Recordings Use of Supervision Project Work/Dissertation Viva Voce Total

Marks 25 30 15 15 15 50 50 200

Semester IV

Course: MSW-403 Social Action and Advocacy Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To understand conceptual and theoretical frameworks of social action and advocacy. b) To develop analytical skills relevant to social action and advocacy for social work practice. c) To understand effectiveness of social action and advocacy for services, rights, social justice, and equal protection of individuals, groups, and communities. d) To understand the process of formulating micro/macro interventions, advocacy and capacity building. Course Outline Unit-I: Social Action: Basic Concepts a) b) c) d)

Social Action: Concept, Meaning, Definition, Importance and Scope Social Action: Approaches and Theoretical framework Social Action: Models, skills, Principles, Strategies and Tactics Social Action & social work: Linkages

Unit-II: Advocacy: Basic Concepts a) b) c) d)

Advocacy : Concept, Meaning, Definition, Importance and Scope Advocacy: Typology, Approaches and Theories Advocacy: Tools, Methods, Skills and Strategies Advocacy and Social Work: Linkages

Unit-III: Social Action, Advocacy and Social Work a) b) c) d)

Social Movements Role of Judiciary in policy Making Analysis of Various path breaking movements and their achievement POSCO, Chilka, National Aliance of people’s moment

Assessment -

Individual assessment through internal test- 40% Individual and attendance presentations in Class-10% Semester End Examination- 50%

Reading List:

1. Boon Andrew and Book Andy (1999) Advocacy, USA: Cavendish Publications. 2. Briskman, L (2007) ‘Advocacy Activism and Social Action’ in Social Work with Indigenous Communities, Sydney, Federation Press. 3. Butcher, Hugh & others (1988) Community Groups in Action, London: Rutledge ad Kegan Paul. 4. Gamson, W.A. (1975). The Strategy of Social Protest. Homewood, IL: Dorsey Press. 5. Rubin, H., & Rubin, I. (2008).Social Action: Magnifying Power through Coalitions. In Community Organizing and Development (pp. 367-382). Boston, MA:Allyn& Bacon. 6. Schneider, R.L. & Lester, L. (2001). Social Work Advocacy: A New framework for Action. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole. 7. Siddique, H.Y. (1984) Social Work and Social Action, New Delhi : Harnam Publications. 8. Social Action, A Quarterly Review of Social Trends and Social Action Trust, Delhi Seminar, New Delhi. 9. NCAS (2000) Fearless Minds: Rights Based Approach to Organizing and Advocacy, Pune : National Centre for Advocacy.

Semester-IV

Course: MSW-404 Dissertations Total Hours: 60 Credits: 4 Objectives: a) b) c) d)

To understand the issues of field from the social work research To understand the process of social work research To conduct research study on any relevant issue/area of intervention To prepare detail study report on the issue identified for research

Guidelines for Research Study Report/Dissertation a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) k) l)

Formulation of Topic Issues and problems of the study/statement of the problem Review of Literature Formulation of the objectives of the study Study Questions Research Methodology Area of Study Sampling Tools of Data Collection Data Analysis Findings The final report (75-100 pages)

Assessment: a) Internal Evaluation: 50% b) External Viva Voce: 50%

Semester IV

Course: MSW-405 (OC) Health and Social Work Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) b) c) d)

To understand relation between health and development Acquire skills to assessing people’s status of health To acquire knowledge about different health care systems in India To understand the social aspects of health

Course Outline Unit-I: Health-Concept and Nature a) b) c) d)

Health: Concept & Scope Indicators of Health and Human Development Nutrition and disease: Communicable and non-communicable disease Profile of health status of Rajasthan and India

Unit-II: Health Care Systems a) b) c) d)

Health care systems: Policy, programme and schemes Health services in India Indigenous System of Medicine(ISM: Nature and Importance Public Health Administration System: Concept, Nature and Importance

Unit-III: Health and Social Work

a) b) c) d)

General issues : disease control Occupational health issues and general health issues Reproductive health issues Right based approach and health

Assessment -

Individual assessment through Internal Test- 40% Individual and attendance presentations in Class-10% Semester End Examination- 50%

Reading List:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Allot, M. (1998), Understanding Health and Social Care, Sage: New Delhi. Atkinson, P. (1995), Medical Talk and Medical Work. Sage: New Delhi. Barker, C (1996), The Health Care Policy Process, Sage: New Delhi. Baru, R. (1998), Private Health Care in India. Sage: New Delhi. Berman, P. (1993), Paying for India’s Health Care. Sage: New Delhi Bracht, N. (1999), Health Promotion at the Community Level, Sage: New Delhi. Modeste, N.A. (1995), Dictionary of Public Health Promotion and Education, Sage: New Delhi Park, K. (1997), Preventive and Social Medicine, M/S Bnarsidas Bhanot: Jabalpur. Surendra S. & Mishra P.D., Health and Diseases, Dynamics and Dimension, New Royal Book Co., Lucknow Mahajan, B.K., Text Book of Social and Preventive Medicine, Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers. Government of India, Annual Reports – Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

Semester IV

Course: MSW-406 (OC) Disaster Management and Social Work Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) To understand the concept of disaster and disaster management b) To understand state response and institutional mechanism c) To understand the role of Social Work in disaster Management Course Outline: Unit: I Disaster Management: Basic Concepts a) Disasters: Concepts, Typology and Causes b) Development and Disaster c) Disaster Management: Approaches d) Disaster Management and Institutional Mechanism Unit: II Disaster Management: Mitigation and Preparedness a) Early Warning & Disaster Preparedness b) Structural and Non Structural Mitigation Measures c) Sustainable Hazards Mitigation d) Risk Assessment Unit: III Disaster Management and Social Work Practice a) Role of Social Work in prevention and disaster preparedness: Community based disaster management and use of local knowledge b) Co-operation and collaboration between civil society and state government in relief and rehabilitation c) Psycho social care and socio economic rehabilitation d) Disaster Management Planning : Recovery and Reconstruction Assessment -

Individual assessment through Internal Test- 40% Individual attendance and presentations in Class-10% Semester End Examination- 50%

Reading lists:

1. Sharma, P.D. (2001) Ecology and Environment, Rastogi Publications, New Delhi 2. Santra, S.C. (2001) Environmental Science, New Central Book Agency, Kolkatta 3. Agarwal, S.K (2006) Environmental Management: New Concept, APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi 4. Sinha, R.K. (Ed.) (1995) Environment-Employment, Rural Poverty, Commonwealth Publishers, New Delhi 5. Ghosh, G.K. (2006) Disaster Management, Vol. I-VI, APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi 6. Narayan, B (2006) Disaster Management, APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi 7. Satendra & Sharma, V.K. (2004) Sustainable Rural Development for Disaster Mitigation, Concept Publishing House, New Delhi 8. Carter Nick, W. (1992) Disaster Management (Disaster Managers Handbook) Asian Development Bank, Manila. 9. IGNOU (1999) Course Material for Foundational Course in Disaster Management, New Delhi 10. IGNOU (2012) Disaster Management and Social Work, New Delhi 11. Sharma, V.K (Ed.) (1999) Disaster Management, NCDM, IIPA, New Delhi

Semester IV

Course Code: MSW-407 (OC) Social Exclusion and Social Work Total Teaching Hours: 30 hours Total Credits: 2 credits Objectives: a) Understand concepts, processes and dynamics of social exclusion b) Understand the protective and promotive institutional mechanism of social inclusion. c) Develop skills for identification of social exclusion and Social Work Intervention Course Outline Unit-I Social Exclusion: Basic Concepts a) Social Exclusion and inclusion: Concept, Dimension, Mechanism and factors b) Social Exclusion: Theories, Approaches and Models c) Social Exclusion: Typology and Critical Analysis d) Vulnerability : Meaning, forms, Indices . Unit-II Social Exclusion: Protective Measures a) b) c) d)

Social Exclusion and Inclusive : Meaning, Philosophy and Values Social Exclusion: Legal Provision Social Exclusion: Institutional Mechanism for Amelioration of Social Exclusion Social Inclusion: Measures, Instruments, Tools, Techniques . Unit-III Social Inclusion and Role of Civil Society a) Social Inclusion : Relation to Human Rights and Inclusive Development b) Role of Civil Society in Social Inclusion c) Social Exclusion and Inclusion: Selected Case Studies d) Role of Social Work in Social Inclusion Assessment -

Individual assessment through Internal test- 40% Individual and attendance presentations in Class-10% Semester End Examination- 50%

Reading List:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. 11. 12.

Abrams, Dominic, Michael A. Hogg, and Joseì M. Marques. Social Psychology of Inclusion and Exclusion. New York: Psychology Press, 2005. Byrne, D. S. Social Exclusion. Jaipur: Rawat Publications, 2009. Gough, Jamie, Aram Eisenschitz, and Andrew McCulloch. Spaces of Social Exclusion. London: Routledge, 2006. Haan, Arjan de. Social Exclusion: Towards an Holistic Understanding of Deprivation. London: Social Development Dept., Dept. for International Development, 1999. Hills, John, Julian Le Grand, and David Piachaud. Understanding Social Exclusion, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. Hills, John. Inequality and the State. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. Human Rights Watch (Organization). Human Rights Watch Caste Discrimination : a Global Concern. New York: Human Rights Watch, 2001. Jordan, Bill. A Theory of Poverty and Social Exclusion. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press, 1996. Justino, Patricia, and J. A. Litchfield. Economic Exclusion and Discrimination: The Experiences of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples. London: Minority Rights Group International, 2003. Kabeer, Naila. Social Exclusion and the MDGs: The Challenge of ‘durable Inequalities’ in the Asian Context. [S.l.]: Institute of Development Studies, 2006. Kahn, Joel S. Modernity and Exclusion. London: SAGE, 2001. Kirsch, Max H. Inclusion and Exclusion in the Global Arena. New York: Routledge, 2006.

Semester IV

MSW-408/MAE-406(OC) Creating Writing To be cross listed across the University with MA English Programme

&

MSW-409(OC) Community Radio To be cross listed with MA Culture Media and studies

.

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SOCIAL WORK - Central University of Rajasthan

CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF RAJASTHAN DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK M.A./Ph.D (SOCIAL WORK) PROGRAMME PREAMBLE: The Department of Social Work established in 20...

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